draft-ietf-ipwave-ipv6-over-80211ocb-19.txt   draft-ietf-ipwave-ipv6-over-80211ocb-20.txt 
Network Working Group A. Petrescu Network Working Group A. Petrescu
Internet-Draft CEA, LIST Internet-Draft CEA, LIST
Intended status: Standards Track N. Benamar Intended status: Standards Track N. Benamar
Expires: August 26, 2018 Moulay Ismail University Expires: September 3, 2018 Moulay Ismail University
J. Haerri J. Haerri
Eurecom Eurecom
J. Lee J. Lee
Sangmyung University Sangmyung University
T. Ernst T. Ernst
YoGoKo YoGoKo
February 22, 2018 March 2, 2018
Transmission of IPv6 Packets over IEEE 802.11 Networks operating in mode Transmission of IPv6 Packets over IEEE 802.11 Networks operating in mode
Outside the Context of a Basic Service Set (IPv6-over-80211-OCB) Outside the Context of a Basic Service Set (IPv6-over-80211-OCB)
draft-ietf-ipwave-ipv6-over-80211ocb-19.txt draft-ietf-ipwave-ipv6-over-80211ocb-20.txt
Abstract Abstract
In order to transmit IPv6 packets on IEEE 802.11 networks running In order to transmit IPv6 packets on IEEE 802.11 networks running
outside the context of a basic service set (OCB, earlier "802.11p") outside the context of a basic service set (OCB, earlier "802.11p")
there is a need to define a few parameters such as the supported there is a need to define a few parameters such as the supported
Maximum Transmission Unit size on the 802.11-OCB link, the header Maximum Transmission Unit size on the 802.11-OCB link, the header
format preceding the IPv6 header, the Type value within it, and format preceding the IPv6 header, the Type value within it, and
others. This document describes these parameters for IPv6 and IEEE others. This document describes these parameters for IPv6 and IEEE
802.11-OCB networks; it portrays the layering of IPv6 on 802.11-OCB 802.11-OCB networks; it portrays the layering of IPv6 on 802.11-OCB
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Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering Internet-Drafts are working documents of the Internet Engineering
Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute Task Force (IETF). Note that other groups may also distribute
working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet- working documents as Internet-Drafts. The list of current Internet-
Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/. Drafts is at https://datatracker.ietf.org/drafts/current/.
Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months Internet-Drafts are draft documents valid for a maximum of six months
and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any and may be updated, replaced, or obsoleted by other documents at any
time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference time. It is inappropriate to use Internet-Drafts as reference
material or to cite them other than as "work in progress." material or to cite them other than as "work in progress."
This Internet-Draft will expire on August 26, 2018. This Internet-Draft will expire on September 3, 2018.
Copyright Notice Copyright Notice
Copyright (c) 2018 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the Copyright (c) 2018 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
document authors. All rights reserved. document authors. All rights reserved.
This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
Provisions Relating to IETF Documents Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
(https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of (https://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
publication of this document. Please review these documents publication of this document. Please review these documents
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1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
2. Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2. Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
3. Communication Scenarios where IEEE 802.11-OCB Links are Used 4 3. Communication Scenarios where IEEE 802.11-OCB Links are Used 4
4. IPv6 over 802.11-OCB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 4. IPv6 over 802.11-OCB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
4.1. Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 4.1. Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
4.2. Frame Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 4.2. Frame Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
4.2.1. Ethernet Adaptation Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 4.2.1. Ethernet Adaptation Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
4.3. Link-Local Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 4.3. Link-Local Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
4.4. Address Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 4.4. Address Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
4.4.1. Address Mapping -- Unicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 4.4.1. Address Mapping -- Unicast . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
4.4.2. Address Mapping -- Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 4.4.2. Address Mapping -- Multicast . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
4.5. Stateless Autoconfiguration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 4.5. Stateless Autoconfiguration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
4.6. Subnet Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 4.6. Subnet Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
5. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 5. Security Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
6. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 6. IANA Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
7. Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 7. Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
8. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 8. Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
9. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 9. References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
9.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 9.1. Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
9.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 9.2. Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Appendix A. ChangeLog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Appendix A. ChangeLog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Appendix B. 802.11p . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Appendix B. 802.11p . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Appendix C. Aspects introduced by the OCB mode to 802.11 . . . . 23 Appendix C. Aspects introduced by the OCB mode to 802.11 . . . . 23
Appendix D. Changes Needed on a software driver 802.11a to Appendix D. Changes Needed on a software driver 802.11a to
become a 802.11-OCB driver . . . 27 become a 802.11-OCB driver . . . 27
Appendix E. EtherType Protocol Discrimination (EPD) . . . . . . 28 Appendix E. EtherType Protocol Discrimination (EPD) . . . . . . 28
Appendix F. Design Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Appendix F. Design Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
F.1. Vehicle ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 F.1. Vehicle ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
F.2. Reliability Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 F.2. Reliability Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
F.3. Multiple interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 F.3. Multiple interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
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one of its IP-enabled interfaces is configured to operate in one of its IP-enabled interfaces is configured to operate in
802.11-OCB mode. The IP-RSU communicates with the IP-OBU in the 802.11-OCB mode. The IP-RSU communicates with the IP-OBU in the
vehicle over 802.11 wireless link operating in OCB mode. vehicle over 802.11 wireless link operating in OCB mode.
OCB (outside the context of a basic service set - BSS): A mode of OCB (outside the context of a basic service set - BSS): A mode of
operation in which a STA is not a member of a BSS and does not operation in which a STA is not a member of a BSS and does not
utilize IEEE Std 802.11 authentication, association, or data utilize IEEE Std 802.11 authentication, association, or data
confidentiality. confidentiality.
802.11-OCB: mode specified in IEEE Std 802.11-2016 when the MIB 802.11-OCB: mode specified in IEEE Std 802.11-2016 when the MIB
attribute dot11OCBActivited is true. The OCB mode requires attribute dot11OCBActivited is true. Note: compliance with standards
transmission of QoS data frames (IEEE Std 802.11e), half-clocked and regulations set in different countries when using the 5.9GHz
operation (IEEE Std 802.11j), and use of 5.9 GHz frequency band. frequency band is required.
Nota: any implementation should comply with standards and regulations
set in the different countries for using that frequency band.
3. Communication Scenarios where IEEE 802.11-OCB Links are Used 3. Communication Scenarios where IEEE 802.11-OCB Links are Used
The IEEE 802.11-OCB Networks are used for vehicular communications, The IEEE 802.11-OCB Networks are used for vehicular communications,
as 'Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments'. The IP communication as 'Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments'. The IP communication
scenarios for these environments have been described in several scenarios for these environments have been described in several
documents; in particular, we refer the reader to documents; in particular, we refer the reader to
[I-D.ietf-ipwave-vehicular-networking-survey], that lists some [I-D.ietf-ipwave-vehicular-networking-survey], that lists some
scenarios and requirements for IP in Intelligent Transportation scenarios and requirements for IP in Intelligent Transportation
Systems. Systems.
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The default MTU for IP packets on 802.11-OCB MUST be 1500 octets. It The default MTU for IP packets on 802.11-OCB MUST be 1500 octets. It
is the same value as IPv6 packets on Ethernet links, as specified in is the same value as IPv6 packets on Ethernet links, as specified in
[RFC2464]. This value of the MTU respects the recommendation that [RFC2464]. This value of the MTU respects the recommendation that
every link on the Internet must have a minimum MTU of 1280 octets every link on the Internet must have a minimum MTU of 1280 octets
(stated in [RFC8200], and the recommendations therein, especially (stated in [RFC8200], and the recommendations therein, especially
with respect to fragmentation). with respect to fragmentation).
4.2. Frame Format 4.2. Frame Format
IP packets are transmitted over 802.11-OCB as standard Ethernet IP packets are transmitted over 802.11-OCB as standard Ethernet
packets. As with all 802.11 frames, an Ethernet adaptation layer is packets. As with all 802.11 frames, an Ethernet adaptation layer
used with 802.11-OCB as well. This Ethernet Adaptation Layer MUST be used with 802.11-OCB as well. This Ethernet Adaptation Layer
performing 802.11-to-Ethernet is described in Section 4.2.1. The performing 802.11-to-Ethernet is described in Section 4.2.1. The
Ethernet Type code (EtherType) for IPv6 MUST be 0x86DD (hexadecimal Ethernet Type code (EtherType) for IPv6 MUST be 0x86DD (hexadecimal
86DD, or otherwise #86DD). 86DD, or otherwise #86DD).
The Frame format for transmitting IPv6 on 802.11-OCB networks is the The Frame format for transmitting IPv6 on 802.11-OCB networks MUST be
same as transmitting IPv6 on Ethernet networks, and is described in the same as transmitting IPv6 on Ethernet networks, and is described
section 3 of [RFC2464]. in section 3 of [RFC2464].
4.2.1. Ethernet Adaptation Layer 4.2.1. Ethernet Adaptation Layer
An 'adaptation' layer is inserted between a MAC layer and the An 'adaptation' layer is inserted between a MAC layer and the
Networking layer. This is used to transform some parameters between Networking layer. This is used to transform some parameters between
their form expected by the IP stack and the form provided by the MAC their form expected by the IP stack and the form provided by the MAC
layer. layer.
An Ethernet Adaptation Layer makes an 802.11 MAC look to IP An Ethernet Adaptation Layer makes an 802.11 MAC look to IP
Networking layer as a more traditional Ethernet layer. At reception, Networking layer as a more traditional Ethernet layer. At reception,
this layer takes as input the IEEE 802.11 Data Header and the this layer takes as input the IEEE 802.11 header and the Logical-Link
Logical-Link Layer Control Header and produces an Ethernet II Header. Layer Control Header and produces an Ethernet II Header. At sending,
At sending, the reverse operation is performed. the reverse operation is performed.
The operation of the Ethernet Adaptation Layer is depicted by the The operation of the Ethernet Adaptation Layer is depicted by the
double arrow in Figure 1. double arrow in Figure 1.
+--------------------+------------+-------------+---------+-----------+ +--------------------+------------+-------------+---------+-----------+
| 802.11 Data Header | LLC Header | IPv6 Header | Payload |.11 Trailer| | 802.11 header | LLC Header | IPv6 Header | Payload |.11 Trailer|
+--------------------+------------+-------------+---------+-----------+ +--------------------+------------+-------------+---------+-----------+
\ / \ / \ / \ /
----------------------------- -------- ----------------------------- --------
\---------------------------------------------/ \---------------------------------------------/
^ ^
| |
802.11-to-Ethernet Adaptation Layer 802.11-to-Ethernet Adaptation Layer
| |
v v
+---------------------+-------------+---------+ +---------------------+-------------+---------+
| Ethernet II Header | IPv6 Header | Payload | | Ethernet II Header | IPv6 Header | Payload |
+---------------------+-------------+---------+ +---------------------+-------------+---------+
Figure 1: Operation of the Ethernet Adaptation Layer Figure 1: Operation of the Ethernet Adaptation Layer
The Receiver and Transmitter Address fields in the 802.11 Data Header The Receiver and Transmitter Address fields in the 802.11 header MUST
MUST contain the same values as the Destination and the Source contain the same values as the Destination and the Source Address
Address fields in the Ethernet II Header, respectively. The value of fields in the Ethernet II Header, respectively. The value of the
the Type field in the LLC Header MUST be the same as the value of the Type field in the LLC Header MUST be the same as the value of the
Type field in the Ethernet II Header. Type field in the Ethernet II Header.
The ".11 Trailer" contains solely a 4-byte Frame Check Sequence. The ".11 Trailer" contains solely a 4-byte Frame Check Sequence.
In OCB mode, IPv6 packets MAY be transmitted either as "IEEE 802.11 The specification of which type or subtype of 802.11 headers are used
Data" or alternatively as "IEEE 802.11 QoS Data", as illustrated in to transmit IP packets is left outside the scope of this document.
Figure 2.
+--------------------+-------------+-------------+---------+-----------+
| 802.11 Data Header | LLC Header | IPv6 Header | Payload |.11 Trailer|
+--------------------+-------------+-------------+---------+-----------+
or
+--------------------+-------------+-------------+---------+-----------+
| 802.11 QoS Data Hdr| LLC Header | IPv6 Header | Payload |.11 Trailer|
+--------------------+-------------+-------------+---------+-----------+
Figure 2: 802.11 Data Header or 802.11 QoS Data Header
The distinction between the two formats is given by the value of the
field "Subtype" in the Frame Control Field. The value of the field
"Subtype" in the 802.11 Data header is 0x0. The value of the field
"Subtype" in the 802.11 QoS header is 8.
The mapping between qos-related fields in the IPv6 header (e.g.
"Traffic Class", "Flow label") and fields in the "802.11 QoS Data
Header" (e.g. "QoS Control") are not specified in this document.
Guidance for a potential mapping is provided in
[I-D.ietf-tsvwg-ieee-802-11], although it is not specific to OCB
mode.
The placement of IPv6 networking layer on Ethernet Adaptation Layer The placement of IPv6 networking layer on Ethernet Adaptation Layer
is illustrated in Figure 3. is illustrated in Figure 2.
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| IPv6 | | IPv6 |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Ethernet Adaptation Layer | | Ethernet Adaptation Layer |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| 802.11 MAC | | 802.11 MAC |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| 802.11 PHY | | 802.11 PHY |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
Figure 3: Ethernet Adaptation Layer stacked with other layers Figure 2: Ethernet Adaptation Layer stacked with other layers
(in the above figure, a 802.11 profile is represented; this is used (in the above figure, a 802.11 profile is represented; this is used
also for 802.11 OCB profile.) also for 802.11 OCB profile.)
Other alternative views of layering are EtherType Protocol Other alternative views of layering are EtherType Protocol
Discrimination (EPD), see Appendix E, and SNAP see [RFC1042]. Discrimination (EPD), see Appendix E, and SNAP see [RFC1042].
4.3. Link-Local Addresses 4.3. Link-Local Addresses
The link-local address of an 802.11-OCB interface is formed in the The link-local address of an 802.11-OCB interface is formed in the
same manner as on an Ethernet interface. This manner is described in same manner as on an Ethernet interface. This manner is described in
section 5 of [RFC2464]. Additionally, if stable identifiers are section 5 of [RFC2464]. Additionally, if stable identifiers are
needed, it is RECOMMENDED to follow the Recommendation on Stable IPv6 needed, it is RECOMMENDED to follow the Recommendation on Stable IPv6
Interface Identifiers [RFC8064]. Additionally, if semantically Interface Identifiers [RFC8064]. Additionally, if semantically
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document freely available at URL document freely available at URL
http://standards.ieee.org/getieee802/ http://standards.ieee.org/getieee802/
download/802.11p-2010.pdf retrieved on September 20th, download/802.11p-2010.pdf retrieved on September 20th,
2013.". 2013.".
Appendix A. ChangeLog Appendix A. ChangeLog
The changes are listed in reverse chronological order, most recent The changes are listed in reverse chronological order, most recent
changes appearing at the top of the list. changes appearing at the top of the list.
From draft-ietf-ipwave-ipv6-over-80211ocb-19 to draft-ietf-ipwave-
ipv6-over-80211ocb-20
o Reduced the definition of term "802.11-OCB".
o Left out of this specification which 802.11 header to use to
transmit IP packets in OCB mode (QoS Data header, Data header, or
any other).
o Added 'MUST' use an Ethernet Adaptation Layer, instead of 'is
using' an Ethernet Adaptation Layer.
From draft-ietf-ipwave-ipv6-over-80211ocb-18 to draft-ietf-ipwave- From draft-ietf-ipwave-ipv6-over-80211ocb-18 to draft-ietf-ipwave-
ipv6-over-80211ocb-19 ipv6-over-80211ocb-19
o Removed the text about fragmentation. o Removed the text about fragmentation.
o Removed the mentioning of WSMP and GeoNetworking. o Removed the mentioning of WSMP and GeoNetworking.
o Removed the explanation of the binary representation of the o Removed the explanation of the binary representation of the
EtherType. EtherType.
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o No encryption is provided in order to be able to communicate o No encryption is provided in order to be able to communicate
o Flag dot11OCBActivated is set to true o Flag dot11OCBActivated is set to true
All the nodes in the radio communication range (IP-OBU and IP-RSU) All the nodes in the radio communication range (IP-OBU and IP-RSU)
receive all the messages transmitted (IP-OBU and IP-RSU) within the receive all the messages transmitted (IP-OBU and IP-RSU) within the
radio communications range. The eventual conflict(s) are resolved by radio communications range. The eventual conflict(s) are resolved by
the MAC CDMA function. the MAC CDMA function.
The message exchange diagram in Figure 4 illustrates a comparison The message exchange diagram in Figure 3 illustrates a comparison
between traditional 802.11 and 802.11 in OCB mode. The 'Data' between traditional 802.11 and 802.11 in OCB mode. The 'Data'
messages can be IP packets such as HTTP or others. Other 802.11 messages can be IP packets such as HTTP or others. Other 802.11
management and control frames (non IP) may be transmitted, as management and control frames (non IP) may be transmitted, as
specified in the 802.11 standard. For information, the names of specified in the 802.11 standard. For information, the names of
these messages as currently specified by the 802.11 standard are these messages as currently specified by the 802.11 standard are
listed in Appendix G. listed in Appendix G.
STA AP STA1 STA2 STA AP STA1 STA2
| | | | | | | |
|<------ Beacon -------| |<------ Data -------->| |<------ Beacon -------| |<------ Data -------->|
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|<--- Auth Res. -------| |<------ Data -------->| |<--- Auth Res. -------| |<------ Data -------->|
| | | | | | | |
|---- Asso Req. ------>| |<------ Data -------->| |---- Asso Req. ------>| |<------ Data -------->|
|<--- Asso Res. -------| | | |<--- Asso Res. -------| | |
| | |<------ Data -------->| | | |<------ Data -------->|
|<------ Data -------->| | | |<------ Data -------->| | |
|<------ Data -------->| |<------ Data -------->| |<------ Data -------->| |<------ Data -------->|
(i) 802.11 Infrastructure mode (ii) 802.11-OCB mode (i) 802.11 Infrastructure mode (ii) 802.11-OCB mode
Figure 4: Difference between messages exchanged on 802.11 (left) and Figure 3: Difference between messages exchanged on 802.11 (left) and
802.11-OCB (right) 802.11-OCB (right)
The interface 802.11-OCB was specified in IEEE Std 802.11p (TM) -2010 The interface 802.11-OCB was specified in IEEE Std 802.11p (TM) -2010
[IEEE-802.11p-2010] as an amendment to IEEE Std 802.11 (TM) -2007, [IEEE-802.11p-2010] as an amendment to IEEE Std 802.11 (TM) -2007,
titled "Amendment 6: Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments". titled "Amendment 6: Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments".
Since then, this amendment has been integrated in IEEE 802.11(TM) Since then, this amendment has been integrated in IEEE 802.11(TM)
-2012 and -2016 [IEEE-802.11-2016]. -2012 and -2016 [IEEE-802.11-2016].
In document 802.11-2016, anything qualified specifically as In document 802.11-2016, anything qualified specifically as
"OCBActivated", or "outside the context of a basic service" set to be "OCBActivated", or "outside the context of a basic service" set to be
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* Timing Advertisement frames, defined in the amendment, should * Timing Advertisement frames, defined in the amendment, should
be supported. The upper layer should be able to trigger such be supported. The upper layer should be able to trigger such
frames emission and to retrieve information contained in frames emission and to retrieve information contained in
received Timing Advertisements. received Timing Advertisements.
Appendix E. EtherType Protocol Discrimination (EPD) Appendix E. EtherType Protocol Discrimination (EPD)
A more theoretical and detailed view of layer stacking, and A more theoretical and detailed view of layer stacking, and
interfaces between the IP layer and 802.11-OCB layers, is illustrated interfaces between the IP layer and 802.11-OCB layers, is illustrated
in Figure 5. The IP layer operates on top of the EtherType Protocol in Figure 4. The IP layer operates on top of the EtherType Protocol
Discrimination (EPD); this Discrimination layer is described in IEEE Discrimination (EPD); this Discrimination layer is described in IEEE
Std 802.3-2012; the interface between IPv6 and EPD is the LLC_SAP Std 802.3-2012; the interface between IPv6 and EPD is the LLC_SAP
(Link Layer Control Service Access Point). (Link Layer Control Service Access Point).
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| IPv6 | | IPv6 |
+-+-+-+-+-+-{ }+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ +-+-+-+-+-+-{ }+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
{ LLC_SAP } 802.11-OCB { LLC_SAP } 802.11-OCB
+-+-+-+-+-+-{ }+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ Boundary +-+-+-+-+-+-{ }+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ Boundary
| EPD | | | | EPD | | |
| | MLME | | | | MLME | |
+-+-+-{ MAC_SAP }+-+-+-| MLME_SAP | +-+-+-{ MAC_SAP }+-+-+-| MLME_SAP |
| MAC Sublayer | | | 802.11-OCB | MAC Sublayer | | | 802.11-OCB
| and ch. coord. | | SME | Services | and ch. coord. | | SME | Services
+-+-+-{ PHY_SAP }+-+-+-+-+-+-+-| | +-+-+-{ PHY_SAP }+-+-+-+-+-+-+-| |
| | PLME | | | | PLME | |
| PHY Layer | PLME_SAP | | PHY Layer | PLME_SAP |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
Figure 5: EtherType Protocol Discrimination Figure 4: EtherType Protocol Discrimination
Appendix F. Design Considerations Appendix F. Design Considerations
The networks defined by 802.11-OCB are in many ways similar to other The networks defined by 802.11-OCB are in many ways similar to other
networks of the 802.11 family. In theory, the encapsulation of IPv6 networks of the 802.11 family. In theory, the encapsulation of IPv6
over 802.11-OCB could be very similar to the operation of IPv6 over over 802.11-OCB could be very similar to the operation of IPv6 over
other networks of the 802.11 family. However, the high mobility, other networks of the 802.11 family. However, the high mobility,
strong link asymmetry and very short connection makes the 802.11-OCB strong link asymmetry and very short connection makes the 802.11-OCB
link significantly different from other 802.11 networks. Also, the link significantly different from other 802.11 networks. Also, the
automotive applications have specific requirements for reliability, automotive applications have specific requirements for reliability,
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Appendix H. Implementation Status Appendix H. Implementation Status
This section describes an example of an IPv6 Packet captured over a This section describes an example of an IPv6 Packet captured over a
IEEE 802.11-OCB link. IEEE 802.11-OCB link.
By way of example we show that there is no modification in the By way of example we show that there is no modification in the
headers when transmitted over 802.11-OCB networks - they are headers when transmitted over 802.11-OCB networks - they are
transmitted like any other 802.11 and Ethernet packets. transmitted like any other 802.11 and Ethernet packets.
We describe an experiment of capturing an IPv6 packet on an We describe an experiment of capturing an IPv6 packet on an
802.11-OCB link. In topology depicted in Figure 6, the packet is an 802.11-OCB link. In topology depicted in Figure 5, the packet is an
IPv6 Router Advertisement. This packet is emitted by a Router on its IPv6 Router Advertisement. This packet is emitted by a Router on its
802.11-OCB interface. The packet is captured on the Host, using a 802.11-OCB interface. The packet is captured on the Host, using a
network protocol analyzer (e.g. Wireshark); the capture is performed network protocol analyzer (e.g. Wireshark); the capture is performed
in two different modes: direct mode and 'monitor' mode. The topology in two different modes: direct mode and 'monitor' mode. The topology
used during the capture is depicted below. used during the capture is depicted below.
The packet is captured on the Host. The Host is an IP-OBU containing The packet is captured on the Host. The Host is an IP-OBU containing
an 802.11 interface in format PCI express (an ITRI product). The an 802.11 interface in format PCI express (an ITRI product). The
kernel runs the ath5k software driver with modifications for OCB kernel runs the ath5k software driver with modifications for OCB
mode. The capture tool is Wireshark. The file format for save and mode. The capture tool is Wireshark. The file format for save and
analyze is 'pcap'. The packet is generated by the Router. The analyze is 'pcap'. The packet is generated by the Router. The
Router is an IP-RSU (ITRI product). Router is an IP-RSU (ITRI product).
+--------+ +-------+ +--------+ +-------+
| | 802.11-OCB Link | | | | 802.11-OCB Link | |
---| Router |--------------------------------| Host | ---| Router |--------------------------------| Host |
| | | | | | | |
+--------+ +-------+ +--------+ +-------+
Figure 6: Topology for capturing IP packets on 802.11-OCB Figure 5: Topology for capturing IP packets on 802.11-OCB
During several capture operations running from a few moments to During several capture operations running from a few moments to
several hours, no message relevant to the BSSID contexts were several hours, no message relevant to the BSSID contexts were
captured (no Association Request/Response, Authentication Req/Resp, captured (no Association Request/Response, Authentication Req/Resp,
Beacon). This shows that the operation of 802.11-OCB is outside the Beacon). This shows that the operation of 802.11-OCB is outside the
context of a BSSID. context of a BSSID.
Overall, the captured message is identical with a capture of an IPv6 Overall, the captured message is identical with a capture of an IPv6
packet emitted on a 802.11b interface. The contents are precisely packet emitted on a 802.11b interface. The contents are precisely
similar. similar.
 End of changes. 26 change blocks. 
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